Social Studies 90

Unit One: The Peopling of the World

Under construction.

 

Unit Two: Early River Civilizations

Under construction.

 

Unit Three: People & Ideas on the Move

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Unit Four: First Age of Empires

Under construction.

 

Midterm Exam

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Unit Five: Ancient Greece

 


 
  Employ your time in improving yourself by [reading] other men's writing, so that you shall gain easly what others have labored hard for.

Socrates

Unit Five introduces students to the development of a distinct Greek culture on the Balkan Peninsula beginning around 3000 BCE. The Mycenaeans and Minoans were the first Greek speaking peoples to arrive in the Balkans. Although both peoples were technologically and culturally advanced, they eventually went into decline and replaced by the Dorians. During the following Dorian Age, Greece entered what historians call a "dark age" as it appears the Greeks lost the ability to read and write for a time. However, after about four centuries, the Dorian Age ended and a new style of political organization called the polis (or city-state) developed in Greece. With the creation of city-states like Sparta, Thebes, Miletus and Athens, Greek culture became reinvigorated: in the process they made tremendous advances in military tactics, logic, science, philosophy, art and politics. Greece continues to shape Western civilization in the present day with its emphasis on the use of reason/science and the importance people continue placing on personal liberty and democracy.

READINGS
ASSIGNMENTS
REVIEW
GAMES
AUDIO REVIEW
BONUS
ASSIGNMENTS
VIDEOS
1 Cultures of the Mountains and Sea
2 Warring City States
3 Democracy and Greece's Golden Age  
4 Alexander's Empire  
5 The Spread of Hellenism  

Unit Six: The Roman Republic

 


 
  The wise are instructed by reason, average minds by experience, the stupid by necessity, and the brute by instinct.

Cicero

Unit Six presents students with an understanding of the evolution of Rome from republic to empire to decline. The site of Rome has enjoyed continous settlement since at least 800 BCE. The location provided a series of advantages: it's seven hills provided a natural defense from land attack; also, the fact it was located 20 miles inland made it less vulnerable to sea-based attack, but allowed residents to still take advantage of sea trade. Rome began humbly enough as a small settlement, eventually becoming dominated by the neighboring Etruscans. Rome ended up being dominated by a series of Roman and Etruscan kings for the next three centuries. Eventually the people grew tired of their kings, rose up, and established a democratic republic. The Roman republic grew in size and strength for the next three hundred years; however, in time Rome started to weaken as powerful generals fought one another for control of its government. This competition destroyed the unity and republican system which had made Rome so stable. For the next four hundred years Rome was dominated by a series of emperors (some able and talented and some not so much). The Roman Empire grew so large it was divided into a western and eastern empire. Barbarians eventually overan the western empire, but the eastern half (called Byzantium) continued to exist until it was conquered by the Ottoman Empire in 1453 CE. Rome's institutions, philosophy, and culture continue to exert tremendous influence on Western civilization.

READINGS
ASSIGNMENTS
REVIEW
GAMES
AUDIO REVIEW
BONUS
ASSIGNMENTS
VIDEOS
1 The Roman Republic
2 The Roman Empire
3 The Rise of Christianity
4 The Fall of the Roman Empire
5 Roots of Western Civilization

Unit Seven: The Americas

Under construction.

Unit Eight: The Muslim World

Under construction.

Final Exam

Under construction.